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Chervil Leaf


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Chervil Leaf

Frontier Bulk Chervil Leaf Flakes, 1 lb. package Frontier Bulk Chervil Leaf Flakes, 1 lb. package (Anthriscus cerefolium)
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Frontier Bulk Chervil Leaf Flakes, 1 lb. package
Frontier Bulk Chervil Leaf Flakes, 1 lb. package
Size: 1 lb
Price: $30.00
Botanical Name: Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.
Product Notes: Chervil's distinctive yet delicate flavor is popular in European cooking. Easy to use (it won't overpower your dishes) and versatile, it's a spice well worth your acquaintance. Try it in pasta, egg, vegetable, and grain dishes, and in soups, sauces, salads and dressings.
Origin: United States
Kosher: KSA Certified
Common Name: Chervil
Plant Part: Leaf
Bar Code: 0-89836-00120-7
1 lb Bulk Bag 30.00 addtocart1

Chervil's distinctive yet delicate flavor is popular in European cooking. Easy to use (it won't overpower your dishes) and versatile, it's a spice well worth your acquaintance. Try it in pasta, egg, vegetable, and grain dishes, and in soups, sauces, salads and dressings.

Botanical name: Anthriscus cerefolium (L.) Hoffm.

ChervilThe Latin chaerophyllum means "festive herb" or "herb of joy." A member of the Apiaceae family, chervil looks (and tastes) a bit like parsley, with white flowers, and rounded, branched, hairy stems. Chervil's distinctive yet delicate flavor is popular in European cooking. Easy to use (it won't overpower your dishes) and versatile, it's a spice well worth your acquaintance. Try it in pasta, egg, vegetable, and grain dishes, and in soups, sauces, salads and dressings. One of the oldest seasonings in Europe, chervil was introduced to France and England by the Romans, who used it as a seasoning. It has been a mainstay of French cuisine for centuries. The Arabs made a liqueur flavored with chervil and cherry, which Europeans adapted to a brandy drink in the 14th century. And it's been a mainstay of French cuisine for centuries. For a really old (ancient Roman) hiccup cure, try a combination of chervil and vinegar.

Directions: Chervil's flavor dissipates once heated, so you'll want to add it near the end of cooking.

Suggested Uses:
Chervil works well in combination with other herbs in seasoning blends. More aromatic and a bit more potent than parsley or celery, chervil can be similarly used. It adds an herbal-anise flavor to poultry, seafood, vegetables, vinegars, cream soups, and vinaigrette dressings. Try it in scrambled eggs or omelets, cheese spreads, potato salad, and pasta sauces. Use it with fish and shellfish, and vegetables like carrots and greens, asparagus, peas, and green beans. Because it blends so well with other spices, you'll find chervil in bouquet garni and fines herbes blends. It's a key ingredient in bearnaise sauce, and in French potato soups. Chervil is also used in Spanish cooking, and in the Netherlands, where fresh chervil accompanies meals for sprinkling on salads and soups.

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Native to southern Russia and western Asia, today chervil is cultivated in France, the United States, and the Netherlands.
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